FIFA Interval Test - Part 2

This is part two of the FIFA Fitness Tests for Referees and Assistant Referees, also called the FIFA Fitness Interval Run Test. The test involves 75m run, 25m walk, 75m run, 25m walk, repeating this sequence for up to 10 laps (a total of 4000m). See also the companion FIFA Interval Test - Part 1, a repeat sprint test.

purpose: The test evaluates an individual's ability to repeatedly perform running intervals over a prolonged period of time, designed to specifically test the physical demands of soccer referees.

equipment required: 400m athletics track, marking cones, measuring tape, whistle or pre-recorded audio cd (make your own), cd player.

pre-test: Explain the test procedures to the subject. Perform screening of health risks and obtain informed consent. Prepare forms and record basic information such as age, height, body weight, gender and test conditions. Measure and use cones to mark out the course. See more details of pre-test procedures.

test setup: place marker cones around a 400m track. Use cones to indicate on the track the start of each run (at the 100m, 200m, 300, and 400m mark) and for the end of each run (75m mark). At each 75m mark, 4 cones are used to mark out a 'finish area' (3 m in front, and 3 m behind the 75 m mark).

procedure: following the audio recording or the test leader's first whistle, the referees must run 75 m in a set time (and arrive in the finish buffer area), they then have to walk forwards 25m to the start of the next run. On the next beep or whistle, referees must again run 75 m followed by another 25m walk. This cycle is repeated until at least 10 laps are completed. The referees may not start their next run before the next signal, and must begin from a standing start.

Football refereeFootball referee

timings: The 75m run time requirement is 15 seconds for all male international referees, and 17 seconds for all female international referees. International male referees have 18 seconds for the 25m walk recovery. For females, International referees have 20 seconds for the 25m walk recovery. The standards are easier for lower level referees.

scoring: If a referee fails to put at least one foot in the finishing area in time, they receive a warning. If they receive a second warning the referee must stop, and the test is failed.

target population: This test was developed specifically for soccer referees, though it is suitable for similar sports teams which are intermittent in nature.

comments: the referees can run in small groups comprising a maximum of 6 people, and if possible, 4 different starting positions can be used, with each and every subgroup being monitored by an individual observer throughout the test.

alternatives: the Dynamic YO-YO Test and the yo-yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 are sometimes used as alternative tests for referees. For referees below national level, the Cooper 12 minute run is often used to assess aerobic fitness.

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