4 Reasons Why You Need A Microfiber Golf Towel On Your Golf Bag Today

Avid golfers use an endless list of accessories to help them on the course, and that includes golf towels. Golf balls, golf tees, golf gloves, ball markers, divot fixers, and headcovers are all common golf accessories, but don’t forget the golf towel. Of course, you need golf balls and tees in order to play the game, but the golf towel might be the 3rd most critical accessory in your collection.

Why do you need a golf towel to play the game? The applications are almost endless. You always want to keep the face and grooves of your clubs clean to ensure your shots have the correct amount of spin. Mud on your golf ball can make it curve in unpredictable ways. It’s important to keep your grips dry on humid or rainy days. You also might need to clean up a spill when you crack open a cold beverage on the back nine of your round.

Golf towels have been used by golfers since the game started in 15th century Scotland, but they haven’t always been specific for golf. You might steal a dish towel from the kitchen or borrow a washcloth from your hotel room. If this is you, it’s time to take advantage of the new technology that’s now incorporated into the modern golf towel. Microfiber golf towels are now available and have several advantages over some random cloth you find in your garage. 

What Are Microfiber Golf Towels?

Microfiber golf towels are the new and improved way to take care of your golf equipment. As the name suggests, they’re made of tiny fibers that are less than one denier or decitex/thread and have a diameter of less than 10 micrometers. For context, a strand of silk is about one denier and about a fifth of the diameter of a human hair. 

Your current golf towel is most likely made from cotton and cotton tends to smear dirt around instead of attracting it. Microfiber golf towels are specifically designed to attract dirt particles -- to lift and trap them. Another way to describe a microfiber golf towel is that it behaves like a magnet for dirt.

Another key difference between a microfiber golf towel and the more classic version made from cotton or polyester/nylon is they won’t fall apart. You won’t end up with strings falling off your towel after several uses.

To state it more simply, microfiber golf towels are a better product. They’re designed to perform better on the course.

golf bag and towelThe golf towel is an essential golf set accessory

4 Reasons Why You Need A Microfiber Golf Towel

1. It Cleans Better / Traps More Dirt

The primary reason you leverage a towel on the course is to clean your clubs and keep your golf balls clean. No one enjoys hitting a shot that unnaturally curves due to the dreaded “mud ball.” Microfiber golf towels act like a magnet for dirt. They collect and trap the particles to remove them from the surface of your golf clubs. Simply put, a better mousetrap (in this case, dirt trap).

2. It Absorbs More Water And Does It Faster

A microfiber golf towel can absorb 7 times its weight in water! Not only does it absorb more water than a cotton towel, but it also dries faster. This can be very helpful to a golfer during a rain shower, a sweaty/humid afternoon, or when dealing with morning dew. Keep your clubs and grips dry in any conditions.

3. It’s Antimicrobial

If we’ve learned anything over the last 15 months it’s that we should do what we can to reduce the spread of microorganisms. A wet, cotton golf towel can be a great place for mold, mildew, bacteria, or viruses to grow. Do you really want those things hanging from your bag? 

4. It’s Durable

All golfers have experienced this problem. Your new cotton golf towel looks and works great for a few rounds, but once you wash it a few times, it starts to fall apart and unravel. No one wants to deal with this on the course and it can make your entire golf bag look sloppy. A microfiber golf towel can last up to 500 washes. 

Are Microfiber Golf Towels Good For Golf Clubs?

Microfiber towels and cloths weren’t originally invented for the golf course. They were introduced to improve your effectiveness and efficiency when cleaning around the house. They work great when cleaning your countertops or dealing with spills. Microfiber towels are perfect for reflective surfaces, such as windows or metals, because they don’t leave any streaks. 

We’re trying to remember -- what are your golf clubs made out of? 

The microfiber cloth/towel was introduced in the mid-80s and started to show up on the golf course soon after. Golfers immediately realized they were more absorbent and dried quicker, but the real advantage is how they remove dirt from the face of your clubs. The microfibers attract and collect the particles of dirt, grass, and sand, leaving your grooves clean.

If you want to spin your wedge shots close like the PGA professionals, you’re going to need clean grooves. You’ll also need a great golf swing, but we’re focused on your golf towel for now!

Add A Microfiber Golf Towel To Your Bag

To quickly summarize, microfiber golf towels simply outperform the cotton or nylon options. They’re more absorbent, remove dirt more efficiently, will last longer (more durable) and have the added bonus of being antimicrobial. On top of performing better, they’re a reasonably priced choice -- you don’t have to break the bank to add one to your bag.

You spent a lot of money on your set of irons and those new golf balls. Why wouldn’t you spend a little bit more to ensure they perform as designed? Those irons can’t control the golf ball if your grooves are filled with mud, sand, and grass. Your golf ball can’t fly straight with a glob of mud/dirt on it. Get the most from your golf equipment by utilizing a microfiber golf towel during your next round. Who knows, you might shoot a new record low!

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