Skewball

The new sport of Skewball was created by Jim Foyle of Queensland, Australia in 2014. Skewball is a game for people of all ages who enjoy social interaction, light exercise of mind and body, fresh air and fun. 

Summary

The game is played as singles or doubles, in halves of 15 minutes duration.   Each single or pair has a matching set of 7 ceebys (CB - Coloured Balls), of the same size and weight but a different colour.  Players use a croquet style mallet, with a 250mm long head, to strike any one of their team's ceebys aiming to connect it with the skewball, a similar size, lighter weight ball of a third colour and propel it into the opposing team's goal. 

Skewball is played on a level, rectangular court with 10 metre sidelines and 5 metre baselines and its centre marked.  The court is formed using four corner pegs (screwdrivers work well!) and bricklayers line. To create goalposts, a peg is placed in the ground one mallet head's length either side of the baselines and centres, leaving about 100mm of the peg protruding.   A ceeby matching coloured swimming noodle is placed over the pegs to form an arch.   Skewball requires precision rather than power and can be played on equal terms by mixed sexes.   

Guidelines

  1. To commence the game, a set of ceebys is distributed no more than a mallet head's width inside each of the court's baselines and the skewball placed on the court's centre.   The toss of a coin determines which team takes the first shot.   At half-time, goalpost colours are transposed, the ceebys and skewball remain in situ and play resumes in the opposite directions.
  2. Shots alternate between the teams with each player taking their shot in sequence, playing any one of their ceebys.
  3. Only the mallet's face is to contact a ceeby.  Any other contact made, e.g. the mallet's side or a player's foot, is penalised.  The offending player's untaken shot is forfeited and one extra shot is awarded to the next player.  The opposing team's next player takes the penalty shot followed by their in turn shot.  However, if the penalty shot results in either the played ceeby or the skewball going out of play, that player's in turn shot is forfeited and the opposing team's next player is awarded a one shot penalty, with the same conditions.
  4. A shot is deemed played when the player's mallet face first makes contact with their ceeby and is complete when all ceebys and the skewball are stationary.   No penalty is incurred if a played ceeby goes out of play, strikes nothing or other ceebys of either team, before or after contacting the skewball.
  5. A goal is scored when all or part of the stationary skewball is on or over the goal line.   On a goal being scored, ceebys remain in situ. the skewball is placed on the centre spot and play resumes.
  6. If after a shot is played, all or part of the skewball stops on or over the court's boundary, unless it is the goal line, it incurs a one shot penalty.  The skewball is placed on the centre spot and the opposing team's next player takes the penalty shot followed by their in turn shot.  However, if the penalty shot results in either the played ceeby or the skewball going out of play, the player's untaken shot is forfeited and the opposing team's next player is awarded a one shot penalty, with the same conditions.
  7. With the above exceptions, a ceeby may roll off the court without penalty but before play resumes, it is to be returned to the court no more than a mallet head's width from the boundary, as near as possible to the point it left the court.
  8.  A shot played after the time signal will not count.
  9. If a drawn result is undesirable, it can be eliminated by a golden goal play-off.   In this case, the skewball is placed on the centre spot and a ceeby is placed no closer than a mallet head's length from it.   An equal number of shots at goal continue in sequence until a clear winner emerges.

equipment required

 

Skewball was conceived and developed by Jim Foyle in Ruby Gardens, Eagleby, Queensland, Australia, who is happy to receive any input - kewtuck at gmail.com

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