Stock Car Racing

Stock car racing is a car racing sport in which production-based cars, called stock cars, are used for racing. The sport is extremely popular in the United States, and has a minor presence in Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

The tracks used for stock car racing are predominantly oval tracks, in which racers travel in the anti-clockwise direction. The tracks are classified into three types based on the length, which are, Short tracks (under 1mile), Speedway (1 to 2 miles), and Superspeedway (over 2 miles).

Each race consists of drivers completing a certain distance in the form of laps around the track. The race distance varies from 200 to 600 miles. Races are conducted over two days in which the racers qualifying speed on the first day is used to decide the starting position for the main race the following day. The driver to first complete the entire distance is the winner of the race.

The highest level of stock car racing competition is the NASCAR Sprint Cup series which features 36 races in various cities within the United States. Two of the races Daytona 500 and Brickyard 400 are the most popular among all the races that draw huge viewership. NASCAR also conducts a second-tier stock car racing series called the Xfinity Series which is also very popular.

Similar Sports

Related Pages