Publications related to the AFL Draft Camp

The AFL draft camp/combine is held annually in about October. Below are some research papers using draft camp test results published. See also a list of draft camp results.

Relationships between repeated sprint testing, speed, and endurance.

by David B Pyne, Philo U Saunders, Paul G Montgomery, Adam J Hewitt, Kevin Sheehan
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (2008), Vol: 22, Issue: 5, Pages: 1633-1637

This study compared and quantified the relationships between repeated sprints, short sprints, and endurance test scores, using the test results of 60 athletes in the 6 x 30-m repeated sprint running test, 20-m sprint test, and the 20-m multistage shuttle run from the AFL draft camp. They found that the repeated sprint ability seems more related to short sprint qualities than endurance fitness.

Positional differences in fitness and anthropometric characteristics in Australian football.

by Pyne DB, Gardner AS, Sheehan K, Hopkins WG.
J Sci Med Sport. 2006 May;9(1-2):143-50.

This study compred height, mass, skinfolds, 20-m sprint, vertical jump, agility run and endurance results from 495 players who attended the annual national AFL draft camps between 1999 and 2004. This study concluded that fitness assessment is useful for differentiating between player positions and identifying some annual trends, and that players born in the second half of the year have been disadvantaged with lower representation at the national draft camp. The only substantial changes in fitness test scores over the 5-year period were a moderate increase in height (0.76, moderate) and a small increase in 20-m sprint time.

Fitness testing and career progression in AFL football.

by Pyne DB, Gardner AS, Sheehan K, Hopkins WG.
J Sci Med Sport. 2005 Sep;8(3):321-32.

This study investigated relationships between anthropometric and fitness tests conducted at the annual AFL National Draft Camp and subsequent career progression of players, from tests of 283 players over three consecutive camps (1999-2001). The study found that players drafted to AFL clubs (72% of total) were better in the sprint and beep tests and marginally faster in the agility test than players not drafted. The study concluded that the 20-m sprint, jump, agility and shuttle run tests have a small but important association with career progression of AFL footballers.

Related Pages

AFl draft
Inside the AFL Draft