Rob Wood

Rob's Sports, Fitness & Science Blog

Entries Tagged as 'Technology'

The Future of Rugby?

October 14th, 2015 · No Comments · Major Events, Rugby Union, Technology

The 2015 Rugby World Cup which is currently in progress has embraced technology with the use of the Hawk-Eye system to help the referee adjudicate decisions, as well as assist with player safety by identifying possible concussion instances and behind play incidents (see more about technology in sports). Is this a step towards the possible futuristic rugby player imagined by the team at bwin in their Alternative Guide to the 2015 Rugby World Cup. They came up with the following possible innovations that we may or may not see in Rugby World Cup competitions of the future. Some food for thought.

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Is an AFL 10th Umpire needed?

September 18th, 2011 · No Comments · AFL, Technology, Umpires & Referees

I have previously discussed whether soccer should have a video referee and after being at an AFL game last night I believe there is a good argument for using video or other technology to adjudicate close goal line decisions in AFL too. Not far from me I saw two incidents where it was a close call whether the ball actually crossed the goal line, and from my position the umpire did not seem to get it right. I have not had the opportunity to see a reply which was surely shown to the home viewers of the match. If the TV viewers can get to see a slow motion reply of such situations immediately after the fact, why can’t they refer close calls to an off field umpire who can watch the same video and then refer their decision back to the field umpires. Rugby union have had such a system for a while now, and international cricket and tennis matches are also using a referral system. It is time for the AFL to join the other major sports.

There are already nine umpires on the field in AFL matches: three field umpires, four boundary umpires and two goal umpires. There is an emergency umpire, who is the tenth. He is currently there as a possible replacement if needed, and also responsible for monitoring behind the play incidents. It would not be too much to ask this umpire to also be responsible to reviewing the video replays when they arise. I have a personal reason for these views – last night my team the Blues lost by 3 points and are out of the finals, if only a video referee system was in place the result may have been different.

Related Pages: About AFLTechnology in Sports

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Cricket Referrals – the umpire is not always right

June 19th, 2009 · No Comments · Cricket, Technology, Umpires & Referees

Cricket has joined some other sports to now have at Test level an umpire referral system. It was first trialed in 2008 (in a Test series between Sri Lanka and India). Unlike in tennis where the challenge and referral decision is clear cut using hawke-eye technology, the cricket referral is adjudicated by another umpire, and is open to further errors. The actual way it works may change and develop, but when it was first brought in this is how it worked.

Players are allowed to challenge decisions made by the on-field umpires, and have them referred to the TV official. For each innings of the Test, each team can challenge any decisions, though they will be limited to three unsuccessful challenges per innings. Only the batsman on the receiving end of the umpire’s original decision or the captain of the fielding side can appeal by making a “T” sign with both forearms at shoulder height. The third umpire uses the technology of the hot spot and slow motion replays at different angles to gain information and make decisions.

It all sounds great for the players and viewers at home, but the pressure is on the umpires. In reality, the process takes too long and can distract from the game. When there are challenges left near the end of an innings, players tend to make frivolous challenges on the off chance of getting a decision overturned. So there are still problems that need to be ironed out, but a great step forward for cricket.

Related Pages: About Cricket, Technology in Sports

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Should Soccer use a video referee?

June 17th, 2009 · 3 Comments · Football (Soccer), Technology, Umpires & Referees

One sport that has so far resisted the use of high-tech assistance is soccer (football). It is about time they got with the 20th century. They can’t avoid the power of the people and the power of the TV replays to upgrade their sports. There are multiple ways that technology could help the refs. How about replays being used to adjudicate on off-side decisions, whether a ball passes over the goal line, and to clarify penalty decisions. An off-field referee could communicate with the umpires on the field using wireless technology.

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Make Your Own Beep Test

May 14th, 2009 · No Comments · Fitness Testing, Technology

In the past you had the option of just playing the beep test on your cd player or mp3 player. There is now a computer software program which enables you to run the test right on your PC or Laptop, with a visual display, and record results directly onto your computer in real time. The Beep Test application provides real-time on-screen display of stage numbers, distance covered and VO2max. There are many additional useful features for a team — player buttons provide one click recording of results and team/season fitness results charts — making the fitness test easy to organize and carry out.

But that is not all – as well as running the standard Beep Test, the software allows the user to design their own test using a few simple commands in a script file. This can be useful for creating intermittent recovery type fitness tests (such as the yo-yo test) or combining an activity with fitness testing or conditioning. With the simple commands of Start, Run, Rest and Repeat, all types of beep type tests can be replicated. For added flexibility the lap distance and running speeds can also be adjusted for different sports and has even been adapted for swimming.

For more info see this page about the Team Beep Test Software.

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