Stretching FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions about stretching for fitness. See more about stretching.

 

Is the list of stretching exercises recommended for everyone?

The list of stretches on this site are those that are commonly used and considered safe and appropriate for the general population. If you follow the stretching guidelines most stretches should be safe to use. However, there may be stretches that are not appropriate to certain people due to a physical injury or illness. If you are unsure about using any particular stretch, please consult a professional such as a physiotherapist or exercise physiologist and get a personal review. On the other hand, not all stretches are suitable for all sports - the stretches used should be specific to the requirements of your sport or activity.

Can I package stretching material from your site and provide to players?shoulder stretch exercise

You are free to use information from this site for personal use (see copyright). Providing some of this information to your team is OK, though you should make sure you make it clear where the information came from with a clear reference to this site.

Do you have a list of stretches for specific sports?

Not really. There are some sport specific stretching exercises for warming up for tenpin, and articles about flexibility for golf.

What is the difference between dynamic and static stretching?

There are a few terms for the different types of stretches that can be done, such as static, active, dynamic, ballistic, isometric, PNF, and the difference between these is not always clear. Static stretching involves placing a muscle in its most lengthened position and holding for at least 20 seconds. The stretch is taken to the point where resistance is felt but no pain. Dynamic stretching movements use muscle power to move the limb through the full range of movement, usually in a functional way. This is different from ballistic stretching, which uses the momentum of a moving body or a limb in an attempt to force it beyond its normal range of motion.

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Disclaimer

The above information is presented as a general guide. The author and publisher take no responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, action or application of medication based on this information. See more: Disclaimer.